Attitudes & beliefs


PUBLISHED: 2017 CATEGORY: Health care providers TYPE: External Link Determinants of non-vaccination and incomplete vaccination in Canadian toddlers

Determinants of non-vaccination and incomplete vaccination in Canadian toddlers

Vaccination coverage remains suboptimal in Canada and sporadic outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases such as measles and pertussis continue to occur. This study was undertaken to identify sociodemographic determinants of total non-vaccination (having never received any vaccine), non-vaccination for measles (0 doses) and incomplete vaccination for pertussis (< 4 doses) among 2-year-old Canadian children. Data from the 2013 Childhood National Immunization Coverage Survey (CNICS) were used. Associations between sociodemographic factors and outcomes were measured by multiple logistic regressions and adjusted odds ratios (aOR) were calculated. A total of 5,477 children were included in the analyses of total non-vaccination, and 3,899 children were included in the analysis of non-vaccination for measles and incomplete vaccination for pertussis. Overall, 2.7% of children (95% CI 2.0–3.3) had received no vaccine at all. Lower parental education, i.e., the responding parent having a high school diploma, trade certificate or less (compared with university graduation) was associated with total non-vaccination (aOR 1.99, 95% CI 1.02–3.91). Non-vaccination for measles was more frequent among children of single parent families (aOR 1.63, 95% CI 1.01–2.61) and those of parents with lower education (aOR 1.86, 95% CI 1.26–2.76). The odds of incomplete vaccination for pertussis was greater among children born outside Canada (aOR 3.10, 95% CI 1.73–5.58), of parents with lower education (aOR 1.92, 95% CI 1.41–2.62), and those whose household income was between $40,000 and $59,999 (aOR 1.47; 95% CI 1.04–2.07) or lower than $40,000 (aOR 1.58, 95% CI 1.13–2.22). Significant regional variation was also found for all outcomes. In conclusion, despite universal access to free childhood vaccines in Canada, regional variation and socioeconomic inequalities in vaccine uptake were still observed. Further analyses are warranted to identify barriers contributing to these variations.

Authors: Gilbert NL, Gilmour H, Wilson SE, Cantin L.
Journal Title: Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

PUBLISHED: 2017 CATEGORY: Health care providers, Parents, Adults, New Canadians, Pregnant women, Seniors TYPE: PDFImmunization information on the internet : can you trust what you read?

Immunization information on the internet : can you trust what you read?

This fact sheet can help you decide if vaccine information you find on the Internet is accurate.

Corporate Authors: Immunize Canada
Publisher: Immunize Canada

PUBLISHED: 2017 CATEGORY: Health care providers, Parents, Adults TYPE: PDFImmunization: Get the Facts

Immunization: Get the Facts

This pamphlet answers common misconceptions and questions about vaccines. Revised and updated in 2017.

Corporate Authors: Immunize Canada
Publisher: Immunize Canada

PUBLISHED: 2017 CATEGORY: Les fournisseurs de soins, Parents, Adultes, Néo-Canadiens, Femmes enceintes, Aînés TYPE: PDFInformation sur la vaccination qu'on trouve sur Internet : Est-ce qu'on peut se fier à ce qu'on lit?

Information sur la vaccination qu'on trouve sur Internet : Est-ce qu'on peut se fier à ce qu'on lit?

Ce feuillet d’information a pour but de vous aider à décider si l’information sur les vaccins que vous trouvez sur Internet est exacte.

Corporate Authors: Immunisation Canada
Publisher: Immunisation Canada

PUBLISHED: 2017 CATEGORY: Les fournisseurs de soins, Parents, Adultes TYPE: PDFLa vaccination : informez-vous

La vaccination : informez-vous

Ce dépliant répond aux questions courantes et aux idées fausses au sujet de la vaccination. Revisé et mis à jour en 2017.

Corporate Authors: Immunisation Canada
Publisher: Immunisation Canada

PUBLISHED: 2017 CATEGORY: Health care providers TYPE: External Link Making the CASE for Vaccines: A new model for talking to parents about vaccines

Making the CASE for Vaccines: A new model for talking to parents about vaccines

It is important to listen carefully to the concerns parents raise regarding vaccines and autism. It is our job as medical and public health professionals to explain the science in a new way. The CASE method combines emotional and scientific talking points to sway parents' emotional responses and help them face the issue more logically.

Authors: Autism Science Foundation

PUBLISHED: 2017 CATEGORY: Health care providers TYPE: PDFOn the benefits of explaining herd immunity in vaccine advocacy

On the benefits of explaining herd immunity in vaccine advocacy

Most vaccines protect both the vaccinated individual and the community at large by building up herd immunity. Even though reaching disease-specific herd immunity thresholds is crucial for eliminating or eradicating certain diseases, explanation of this concept remains rare in vaccine advocacy. An awareness of this social benefit makes vaccination not only an individual but also a social decision. Although knowledge of herd immunity can induce prosocial vaccination in order to protect others, it can also invite free-riding, in which individuals profit from the protection provided by a well-vaccinated society without contributing to herd immunity themselves. This cross-cultural experiment assesses whether people will be more or less likely to be vaccinated when they know more about herd immunity. Results show that in cultures that focus on collective benefits, vaccination willingness is generally higher. Communicating the concept of herd immunity improved willingness to vaccinate, especially in cultures lacking this prosocial cultural background. Prosocial nudges can thus help to close these immunity gaps.

Authors: Betsch C et al.
Journal Title: Nature: Human Behaviour

PUBLISHED: 2017 CATEGORY: Health care providers TYPE: External Link Vaccine Hesitancy: In Search of the Risk Communication Comfort Zone

Vaccine Hesitancy: In Search of the Risk Communication Comfort Zone

This paper reports the findings of a national online survey to parents of children aged 5 and younger. The objectives of the study were to assess parental understanding of childhood immunizations, identify sources of information that they trust for vaccine-related content, assess where parents with young children stand on the key issues in the public debate about vaccination, and identify which risk communication messages are most effective for influencing the behaviours of vaccine hesitant parents.

Authors: Joshua Greenberg, Eve Dubé, Michelle Driedger
Journal Title: PLOS Currents

PUBLISHED: 2016 CATEGORY: Les fournisseurs de soins TYPE: External Link Couverture vaccinale des adultes canadiens : résultats de l'Enquête nationale sur la vaccination des adultes de 2014

Couverture vaccinale des adultes canadiens : résultats de l'Enquête nationale sur la vaccination des adultes de 2014

L’Enquête nationale sur la vaccination des adultes (ENVA) permet de mesurer la couverture vaccinale dans la population adulte au Canada et d’évaluer les progrès réalisés dans l'atteinte des cibles nationales. Le prochain cycle de l’ENVA aura lieu en 2016. L’Agence de la santé publique du Canada continuera à collaborer avec les provinces, les territoires et les autres intervenants afin d’améliorer les méthodes d’évaluation de la couverture vaccinale. L’éducation du public et des professionnels et les campagnes de sensibilisation continueront également de promouvoir les avantages et l’innocuité de l’immunisation au Canada.

Corporate Authors: Agence de la santé publique du Canada
Publisher: Agence de la santé publique du Canada

PUBLISHED: 2016 CATEGORY: Health care providers TYPE: External Link Vaccine uptake in Canadian adults: results from the 2014 adult National Immunization Coverage Survey

Vaccine uptake in Canadian adults: results from the 2014 adult National Immunization Coverage Survey

The Adult National Immunization Coverage Survey (aNICS) constitutes an ongoing approach to measuring adult immunization coverage in Canada and monitoring progress towards national targets. The next aNICS cycle will take place in 2016. The Public Health Agency of Canada will continue to work to collaborate with provinces, territories and other stakeholders to improve immunization coverage assessment methodology. Public and professional education and outreach campaigns will also continue to promote the benefits and safety of immunization in Canada.

Corporate Authors: Public Health Agency of Canada
Publisher: Public Health Agency of Canada