Resources


PUBLISHED: 2019 CATEGORY: Parents TYPE: External Link MMR vaccine does not cause autism. Examine the evidence.

MMR vaccine does not cause autism. Examine the evidence.

There is no scientific evidence that MMR vaccine causes autism. The question about a possible link between MMR vaccine and autism has been extensively reviewed by independent groups of experts in the United States, including the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine (now renamed the National Academy of Medicine). These reviews have concluded that the available epidemiologic evidence does not support a causal link between MMR vaccine and autism

Corporate Authors: Immunization Action Coalition
Publisher: Immunization Action Coalition

PUBLISHED: 2019 CATEGORY: Health care providers TYPE: External Link Overview of a Knowledge Translation (KT) Project to improve the vaccination experience at school: The CARD™ System

Overview of a Knowledge Translation (KT) Project to improve the vaccination experience at school: The CARD™ System

Students experience fear, pain, and fainting during vaccinations at school. While evidence-based interventions exist, no Knowledge Translation (KT) interventions have been developed to mitigate these symptoms. A multidisciplinary team—the Pain Pain Go Away Team—was assembled to address this knowledge-to-care gap. This manuscript provides an overview of the methodology, knowledge products, and impact of an evidence-based KT program developed and implemented to improve the vaccination experience at school.

Authors: Taddio A et al.
Journal Issue: Supplement 1
Journal Title: Paediatrics and Child Health
Journal Volume: Volume 24
Publisher: Oxford Academic

PUBLISHED: 2019 CATEGORY: Health care providers TYPE: External Link Pertussis vaccine effectiveness in a frequency matched population-based case-control Canadian Immunization Research Network study in Ontario, Canada 2009–2015

Pertussis vaccine effectiveness in a frequency matched population-based case-control Canadian Immunization Research Network study in Ontario, Canada 2009–2015

Researchers estimated pertussis vaccine effectiveness through a case-control study of 1335 cases statutorily reported to public health in Ontario and occurring between January 1, 2009 and March 31, 2015, compared with 5340 randomly selected population controls, frequency-matched by age, primary-care provider and year of diagnosis. Pertussis cases met provincial confirmed or probable case definitions. Researchers used multivariable logistic regression to estimate crude and adjusted odds ratios.

Authors: Crowcroft NS et al.
Journal Title: Vaccine
Publisher: Elsevier

PUBLISHED: 2019 CATEGORY: Health care providers TYPE: External Link Piloting The CARD™ System for education of students about vaccination: Does it improve the vaccination experience at school?

Piloting The CARD™ System for education of students about vaccination: Does it improve the vaccination experience at school?

Many students are fearful of vaccine injection-associated pain. In prior research, we created Knowledge Translation (KT) tools to address school vaccinations and associated pain, fear, and fainting. The objectives of this pilot implementation project were to determine the acceptability and impact of these KT tools on student knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of their vaccination experience.

Authors: Taddio A
Journal Issue: Supplement 1
Journal Title: Paediatrics and Child Health
Journal Volume: Volume 24
Publisher: Oxford Academic

PUBLISHED: 2019 CATEGORY: Health care providers TYPE: External Link Stakeholder feedback on The CARD™ System to improve the vaccination experience at school

Stakeholder feedback on The CARD™ System to improve the vaccination experience at school

School-based vaccination programs can be a source of distress for many students due to the pain from the needle injection and related fears. We created a multifaceted Knowledge Translation (KT) intervention to address vaccination and pain, fear, and fainting called The CARD™ System. The objectives were to document acceptability of key tools included in the multifaceted KT intervention and their effectiveness in improving knowledge and attitudes about vaccination pain and fear.

Authors: Taddio A
Journal Issue: Supplement 1
Journal Title: Paediatrics and Child Health
Journal Volume: Volume 24
Publisher: Oxford Academic

PUBLISHED: 2019 CATEGORY: Health care providers, Parents TYPE: External Link Talking about Vaccines: Autism

Talking about Vaccines: Autism

Claims that vaccines cause autism have led some parents to delay or refuse vaccines for their children. The most common claims are that autism is caused by MMR vaccine, vaccines that contain thimerosal, or too many vaccines. Many scientific studies have been done to test these claims. None has shown any correlation between vaccines and autism.

Corporate Authors: Immunization Action Coalition
Publisher: Immunization Action Coalition

PUBLISHED: 2019 CATEGORY: Health care providers TYPE: External Link The CARD™ System for improving the vaccination experience at school: Results of a small-scale implementation project on program delivery

The CARD™ System for improving the vaccination experience at school: Results of a small-scale implementation project on program delivery

Researchers conducted a small-scale implementation study that integrated The CARD™ System (C-Comfort, A-Ask, R-Relax, D-Distract)—a multifaceted knowledge translation intervention designed to improve the vaccination experience at school—within the school vaccination program.

Authors: Taddio A et al.
Journal Issue: Supplement 1
Journal Title: Paediatrics and Child Health
Journal Volume: Volume 24
Publisher: Oxford Academic

PUBLISHED: 2019 CATEGORY: Health care providers TYPE: External Link The CARD™ System for improving the vaccination experience at school: Results of a small-scale implementation project on student symptoms

The CARD™ System for improving the vaccination experience at school: Results of a small-scale implementation project on student symptoms

Many students are afraid of receiving vaccinations at school. We implemented a novel, multifaceted knowledge translation intervention incorporating evidence-based vaccination coping strategies—The CARD™ System (C-Comfort, A-Ask, R-Relax, D-Distract)—and evaluated impact on student attitudes, knowledge, coping strategies used, and symptoms during school-based vaccinations.

Authors: Freedman T et al.
Journal Issue: Supplement 1
Journal Title: Paediatrics and Child Health
Journal Volume: Volume 24
Publisher: Oxford Academic

PUBLISHED: 2019 CATEGORY: Health care providers TYPE: External Link The Salzburg Statement on Vaccination Acceptance

The Salzburg Statement on Vaccination Acceptance

Immunization represents one of the greatest public health achievements. Vaccines save lives, make communities more productive and strengthen health systems. They are critical to attaining the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Vaccination also represents value for investment in public health. It is undisputedly one of the most cost-effective ways of avoiding disease, each year preventing 2–3 million deaths globally.

Concerned scientists, public health professionals, physicians, and child health advocates issue this Salzburg Statement along with the International Working Group on Vaccination and Public Health Solutions, proclaiming their unwavering commitment to universal childhood vaccination, and their pledge to support the development, testing, implementation, and evaluation of new, effective, and fact-based communication programs.

The goal is to explain vaccinations to parents or caregivers, answer their questions, address their concerns, and maintain public confidence in the personal, family and community protection that childhood vaccines provide. Every effort will also be made to communicate the dangers associated with these childhood illnesses to parents and communities since this information seems to have been lost in the present-day narrative. While vaccine misinformation has led to serious declines in community vaccination rates that require immediate attention, in other communities, particularly in low-income countries, issues such as lack of access. and unstable supply of vaccines need to be addressed.

Authors: Ratzan S et al.
Journal Title: Journal of Health Communication
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Online

PUBLISHED: 2019 CATEGORY: Adultes, Néo-Canadiens, Aînés TYPE: PDFVaccination des adultes : De quels vaccins avez-vous besoin?

Vaccination des adultes : De quels vaccins avez-vous besoin?

Fournit une liste de vaccins à considérer, pour les adultes.

Authors: Immunisation Canada
Corporate Authors: Immunisation Canada
Publisher: Immunisation Canada